Interesting Words from Orley Farm & Vicar of Bullhampton

A load of old Trollope from the masterful mid-Victorian novelist!

Incorrigible – adj. Incapable of being corrected or reformed: “an incorrigible criminal”.

Disquisition – noun. A formal discourse on a subject, often in writing.

Hoyden – noun. A high-spirited, boisterous, or saucy girl: “she was a veritable hoyden”.

Harangue – noun/verb. a long, passionate, and vehement speech, esp. one delivered before a public gathering.

Objurgate – tr/verv. To scold or rebuke sharply; berate.

Excoriate – tr/verb. To censure strongly; denounce: “an editorial that excoriated the administration for its inaction”.

Sagacious – adj. Having or showing keen discernment, sound judgment, and farsightedness.

Matutinal – adj. of or occuring in the morning.

Dudgeon – noun. A sullen, angry, or indignant humor: “Slamming the door in Meg’s face, Aunt March drove off in high dudgeon” (Louisa May Alcott).

Animadvert – int.verb. To remark or comment critically, usually with strong disapproval or censure: “a man . . . who animadverts on miserly patients, egocentric doctors, psychoanalysis and Lucky Luciano with evenhanded fervor” (Irwin Faust).

Equipoise – noun. Even balance of weight or other forces; equilibrium

Superlative – adj.  Of the highest order, quality, or degree; surpassing or superior to all others.

Cupidity – noun. Excessive desire, especially for wealth; covetousness or avarice.

Rapacious – adj. Taking by force; plundering.

Laconic – adj. Using or marked by the use of few words; terse or concise.

Plaintive – adj. Expressing sorrow; mournful or melancholy.

Myrmidon – noun. A faithful follower who carries out orders without question.

Surreptitiously – adj. Obtained, done, or made by clandestine or stealthy means.

Approbation – noun. An expression of warm approval; praise. Official approval.

Sophistry – noun.pl. A plausible but misleading or fallacious argument.

Spoliation – noun. The act of despoiling or plundering.

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